BitTorrent Client uTorrent Suffers Security Vulnerability

uTorrent

The popular torrent software, uTorrent, was found to have a serious vulnerability. According to Tavis of the Google Project-Zero, the uTorrent software is vulnerable to remote attacks. The way it works is that an attacker can user a website to perform a simple DNS Rebinding attack to download malware anywhere onto the victim’s computer through the uTorrent software. It is suggested to either stop using the software entirely or do not have the uTorrent software running when not in use till the issue is fixed.

Topics

Security flaw in Moto G5 Plus Prime Exclusive grants access to phone with the tap of a lockscreen ad

Motorolla

Amazon has been running its Prime Exclusive program for some time now. Essentially, the company partners with phone manufacturers to offer noticeably lower prices on devices in exchange for preloaded Amazon apps and advertisements on the lock screen.

Topics

This 15-year-old macOS flaw is really rather embarrassing for Apple

Apple Hack

A bug in macOS, which the researcher pointed out on twitter (hat tip WccfTech) has been present for some 15 years in Apple’s operating system, is a local privilege escalation vulnerability found in an extension of the macOS kernel, effectively the heart of the operating system.

 

Hackers with the know-how can execute arbitrary code or install a root shell to effectively allow security measures to be bypassed, root permissions to be gained and essentially allow an illegitimate user to take control of a targeted Mac machine.

Topics

How to spot a fake VPN

VPN Icon

With the FCC chair’s recent push to dismantle net neutrality, on top of last month’s rollback of FCC regulations that would have protected online privacy, interest in virtual private networks (VPNs) is probably at an all-time high. Targeted marketing, based on your online searching, viewing, shopping – everything – habits, is already prevalent. These new changes will most certainly result in companies’ scrutinizing and selling your data even more aggressively.

Topics

KRACK Wi-Fi attack threatens all networks: How to stay safe and what you need to know

KRACK Icon

A devastating flaw in Wi-Fi’s WPA security protocol makes it possible for attackers to eavesdrop on your data when you connect to Wi-Fi. Dubbed KRACK, the issue affects the Wi-Fi protocol itself—not specific products or implementations—and “works against all modern protected Wi-Fi networks,” according to Mathy Vanhoef, the researcher that discovered it. That means that if your device uses Wi-Fi, KRACK likely impacts it.

Topics